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Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:33 pm

Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:30 pm
Posts: 1

Hello im interested in purchasing three alienbee 800s to use with my nikon d90. But i also want to get either a mamiya or hasselblad 120 film camera. How would you hook up the strobes to a film camera of that sort?
Thanks
Ness




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Mon Jul 19, 2010 1:54 pm

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Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2009 10:43 am
Posts: 5266

It will depend on the specific camera set up, but all of the older cameras have a PC connection on the body and/or lens. You can connect the standard sync cord to that socket, or you can connect a remote to that socket as well.




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Tue Jun 18, 2013 4:54 pm

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 9:42 pm
Posts: 15

FlyNessv wrote:
Hello im interested in purchasing three alienbee 800s to use with my nikon d90. But i also want to get either a mamiya or hasselblad 120 film camera. How would you hook up the strobes to a film camera of that sort?
Thanks
Ness


You probably know this by now but work great with medium format cameras. I currently shoot with a Mamiya RZ67 ProII. I just plug my transmitter into the hotshoe and snap away. Before I had the wireless CyberSync I just plugged them into the pc socket on my lens. I do use the White Lightning X800s but the connections are the same as the Alien Bees.

-Charles




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Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:13 pm

Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 5:39 am
Posts: 12

Ness, I use old Cactus 4's on the Nikon D60 I have and use the pc connection into the Cactus for the Mamiya 645 and even the old Super Press 23.......all work great with the Bees and the White Lightnings I have. No need to go all expensive unless you need a bunch of control from the camera.

I don't know if this will surprise you or not, but I shoot in manual exclusively with the Nikon. Might I also suggest a really good flash meter to go with your setup unless you already have one.....

Bob




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Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:03 am

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 9:42 pm
Posts: 15

Safetybob wrote:
...Might I also suggest a really good flash meter to go with your setup unless you already have one.....

Bob



Good point Bob. Ness, I use a Sekonic L-358 and get my exposures right really close to 100% of the time.




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Thu Aug 18, 2016 10:14 pm

Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2016 9:53 pm
Posts: 1

Technical Support wrote:
It will depend on the specific camera set up, but all of the older cameras have a PC connection on the body and/or lens. You can connect the standard sync cord to that socket, or you can connect a remote to that socket as well.


Hi

I would like to expand on Ness' question. In addition to a nikon D800 and pocket wizards, I have a Hasselblad 500 cm and a 4x5 field camera - all analog, not digital. Back in the old days, I would connect my hassey to the power pack and all 1-3 lights that were plugged in would fire when I pressed the shutter. If I connect the hassey, for example, to an Einstein via a standard sync cord, how can I fire the other lights simultaneously (for arguments sake a total of 3 lights)?

Thanks

Shula




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Fri Aug 19, 2016 10:19 am

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Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2009 10:43 am
Posts: 5266

If you connect a flash via a proper sync cord to your camera (regardless of the camera), that flash will fire when the photo is taken.

Additional flashes have optical slave eyes built into them. These optical triggers will sense the first flash going off, and fire themselves. There is not enough delay between the two flashes firing to affect the image. However, this does require line of sight, and no outside source of pulsing light (i.e. no other flash photography)

Secondly, you can connect the transmitter to the camera (you may need an adapter, depending on the transmitter and camera in question), and receivers to each of the lights. When the camera fires, so will the remotes, and in turn, so will the flash units.

You can also use a network of wires an splitters to hardwire all of them together, but that is cumbersome, at best. Here is an adapter that can connect all three cords to your camera: http://www.paulcbuff.com/ss1.php




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